Tag Archives: historical

Pride and Prej themed day out: Vaucluse House

It’s difficult for us kiddos to find Pride and Prejudice (or Jane Austen, or Regency) related places to visit in Sydney, or anywhere in Australia really.  So when one does find a place that is utterly perfect for (in this case) a book club, or a fan, it is one’s duty to share the discovery.  Now, I can’t claim that this was created to fit Pride and Prejudice (because, um, it wasn’t) nor can I claim that the links were as obvious as some might like (they aren’t).  But it was so charming, and delightful, a day and so steeped in Pride and Prejudice fun that I can’t help myself in sharing it.

Vaucluse House, from the Historic Houses Trust, in (fittingly) the wealthy suburb of Vaucluse, was built by William Charles Wentworth between 1805 and 1860.  While a lot of scandal exists behind the Wentworth name, the house is a stunning example of architecture and decor of the time, plus the history is incredible (The Australian newspaper, the first independent paper, was created by Wentworth).  Costing us a mere $4 concession (got to love being a student) which included a fantastic tour by a lovely guide it’s a fantastic glimpse into the lives of people at the time. We were even allowed to go past the barriers and walk around some of the rooms and gaze longingly at various grandfather clocks, pianos, fireplaces, statuettes and chandeliers on display.

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Filed under A good find, Discussion, Other Review

Review: Luisa Dillner’s The Complete Book Of Sisters

I maintain on this blog, and to all the people who ask me in bewilderment, that the importance of Pride and Prejudice- for me, that is- is the relationship between the females.  It is only fitting then that, as I was curiously reading Dillner’s book about sisterly affection, Pride and Prejudice should be mentioned multiple times- and a quote from Cassandra Austen should grace the dust jacket “She was the sun of my life, the gilder of every pleasure, the soother of every sorrow; I had not a thought concealed from her, and it is as if I had lost a part of myself.”

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Filed under Book Review, Discussion